Great Scot Archive
Issues from 1998
Issues from 1998
 
 
 
 

Publications

Building on a history of service and courage

02a

The Hon Dr David Kemp Chairman of the Scotch College Council

Making Scotch the best school it can possibly be is a lasting tribute to past Collegians to whom we owe so much.

This year, 2015, promises to be a memorable one for Scotch..During this one hundredth anniversary of the Gallipoli campaign, our school community will be recalling and remembering the 33 Scotch boys who gave their lives at Anzac Cove in the service of their country, and the more than 200 who made the ultimate sacrifice during the war.

This will also be a year which will see Scotch planning and building for the future, as the construction of the Sir Zelman Cowen Centre for Science gets under way, and the School Council enters a new phase of planning for the further development of the campus in the years ahead.

Perhaps there is something symbolic in the fact that the Cowen Centre will be adjacent to the Cardinal Pavilion, the headquarters of Scotch rowing.

One of the lives lost in the Gallipoli campaign in 1915 was that of James Drummond Burns, among the greatest literary talents Scotch has seen. Jim Burns had been editor of The Scotch Collegian the previous year, a school prefect and a member of the 1st Crew. He was also the author of one of the favourite songs of Scotch boys, the Boating Song, one of whose phrases, ‘a deepening roar’, is the title of Jim Mitchell’s history of the school. Burns is remembered internationally for the poem he wrote as he left for Gallipoli, For England.

World War I, vital though it was to secure Australia’s freedom from German imperial aggression, took a heavy toll on our community.

Of the approximately 1,300 former Scotch Collegians who enlisted, more than 200 lost their lives..And the losses were not only of former pupils. Another sad loss was that of George Wood, teacher of history and English, who passionately loved the school, and played a leading role in the establishment of the Foundation Day Concert. Wood was the author of both the College Anthem and the College Song. He was killed in France in 1917.

Wood and Burns spoke for hundreds of Scotch Collegians when they articulated the values and spirit of the school in their songs and writings. In an editorial in The Scotch Collegian, Jim Burns had written of ‘the spirit of the School, her high ideals, the striving after all that is best and noblest’, and George Wood of the enthusiasm and love of the school by its pupils and their pride in its school buildings.

When Dr Littlejohn had the stained glass windows installed in the Memorial Hall in 1930 as a tribute to the boys who had fought, the figures embodied in them symbolised the values of Courage, Honour and Service.

If the Memorial Hall reminds us of the ‘patriae’ (country) of the School motto, and the Littlejohn Chapel of the importance of faith (‘Deo’), our new developments reflect the emphasis on reason and learning (‘litteris’) that the sacrifices of young Australians, including many Scotch Collegians, have given us the privilege of fostering and developing in a new era..This year will see the coming together of three key elements for the future of Scotch. Our Principal, Tom Batty, has brought to Scotch an educational vision that, with the support of our teaching staff, sees the school moving from strength to strength in bringing the best out of each boy. This educational vision has now become the basis for the design and planning of each of the new buildings in the Council’s Development Plan for the school.

The Council this year will be seeking to support both the Principal’s vision and its Development Plan, with a strategy to further secure the financial strength of the school, in a way that will make possible the realisation and detailing of the vision for the future of the school on this Hawthorn campus. The members of each of the major sub-committees of the Council, especially Finance, Property, Investment, and Risk, will be heavily engaged in this task, as will the Council as a whole.

In looking ahead, Scotch is also fortunate to have a dynamic Development Office led by our Director of Development, Tim Shearer, to support the highly successful fundraising campaign led by the President of the Foundation and past Council Chairman, Michael Robinson and his teams of volunteers. The Old Scotch Collegians’ Association is playing a key role as well.

I am confident that 2015 will see the whole Scotch community working enthusiastically and seamlessly together to make Scotch the best school that it can possibly be. That is the most lasting tribute we can give to those past Collegians whose love of the school has come down to us across the years and to whom we owe so much.

03_01

ABOVE: THE SCHOOL COUNCIL AND SCHOOL LEADERS. TOP ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT: ROBERT PHILLPOT (’91), JOHN SIMPSON (’75), SUSAN HUGHES, JONATHAN BUCKLEY (’83), PROF ANDREW HOLMES (’61), JOHN IRESON, PETER FINDLAY (’89), DUNCAN MCGREGOR. SECOND ROW: RICHARD LOVERIDGE (’80), SIMON REICHELT (FINANCE MANAGER), JON ABBOTT (HEAD OF JUNIOR SCHOOL), TOM ANDERSON (SCHOOL VICE CAPTAIN), REV IVAN BARKER, HAMISH TADGELL (’85), FIONA PEARSE, ROSS CONGLETON (’76 – BURSAR). FRONT ROW: BEN MISHRICKY (CAPTAIN OF THE BOARDING HOUSE), MIKE SIM (’78), TOM BATTY (SCHOOL PRINCIPAL), HON DR DAVID KEMP (’59 – CHAIRMAN OF COUNCIL), REV DR JOHN WILSON (VICE-CHAIRMAN OF COUNCIL), JAMES ZAGAME (SCHOOL CAPTAIN).

Updated: 3 October 2016